When E.F. Hutton called, restaurateur listened

Hutton Seafood & Raw Bar opening later this month in Northwood

There’s a new restaurant opening soon in West Palm Beach’s Northwood section.  The restaurant is called Hutton. The restaurant owner’s name is Tim.

But Timothy Hutton, the actor, is nowhere near this eatery.

Instead, owner Tim Klinefelter drew inspiration elsewhere.

Before delving into that story, however, it’s important to understand what Klinefelter was not going to name it: Klinefelter.

“I would never name a restaurant that,” he said, laughing.

Restaurant names should convey something about the place, be simple to remember and yet somehow, memorable.

Spouses or family members are easy names to turn to for a restaurant moniker. But many restaurateurs privately admit they default to naming their restaurants after their pets (Henry’s restaurant, named after a King Charles spaniel in suburban Delray Beach), or just inventing a word (Bolay, with locations in Wellington, Boca Raton and Palm Beach Gardens.)

Klinefelter wanted to go in a different direction.

He thought of his time spent on Palm Beach during the past two years. It’s a place he visited and then grew to love after giving notice to his employer/partner in Charleston, S.C. After 10 years, Klinefelter left his job at Pearlz Oyster Bar, where he was general manager and operating partner.

Klinfelter said he needed a break. He described Pearlz as “insanely busy,” where every seat is filled within 15 minutes of opening.

In Florida, Klinefelter said he was inspired by the elegance of Palm Beach. And he wanted to acknowledge its rising profile, thanks to President Donald Trump. Trump owns Mar-a-Lago, the ocean-to-lake estate built by Marjorie Merriweather Post and her husband, financier E.F. Hutton, who co-founded a brokerage bearing his name.

So…Hutton.

“The name is synonymous and historic with Palm Beach,” Klinefelter said. Plus, he added, “It’s crisp.”

Look for fresh seafood items with an occasional hint of Klinefelter’s longtime career spent around Low Country cuisine: Sautéed shrimp with creole gravy and hoe cakes, or crayfish beignets, for example.

Shrimp and hoe cakes

Klinefelter said he’s taken care to design the space to be both elegant and inviting. He’s angling to attract not only Northwood neighbors but also Palm Beachers who might be inclined to drive over the new Flagler MemorialBridge, avoid downtown’s traffic and instead zip up Flagler Drive to dine.

Hutton Seafood & Raw Bar, at 407 Northwood Road, is slated to open Aug. 22.

Hutton artwork by Robert Shelton

Why Park Ave BBQ is going into The Gardens Mall

Park Avenue BBQ Grille

It’s been a long time coming, folks. But Park Avenue BBQ Grille owner Dean LaVallee is a patient man. He’s a happy one, too, because Park Avenue finally is going to be part of the The Gardens Mall in Palm Beach Gardens.

Park Avenue will take over the Counter Burger space in the mall. Expect a full bar and outside seating, with an opened slated for August.

LaVallee said he’s craved a high-profile location for years but was never prominent enough to win the attention of bigtime shopping centers.

But shopping centers are undergoing big changes now.

With sales pinched by online retailers and fickle shoppers, mall leasing managers are looking for creative and popular tenants that will create a sense of community — and draw people back to the malls.

Park Avenue BBQ fits the bill, said mall leasing manager Al Ferris.

“It’s the right place at the right time,” LaVallee said.

When you talk about Park Avenue, you can’t get more local or community-minded.

The eatery was started by LaVallee in 1988 in Lake Park, and it has  maintained a loyal following as it has grown to seven locations in Palm Beach County and the Treasure Coast. The Gardens Mall will be its eighth store.

“Every city in the world has five Outbacks and they’re all the same,” LaVallee said. “Now the marketplace is swinging back to what’s truly local.”

Park Avenue has a very loyal fan base: It ranked #1 on a reader poll of Most Popular BBQ joints around.

Customers say the meat is tender, the sauces flavorful and the sides to die for, especially the cornbread.

But Park Avenue also is innovative and willing to live up to the Park Avenue in its name.

The farm-to-table method of dining, so popular at upscale eateries, is about to become a staple at Park Avenue, which actually has its own farm.

Look for pineapple, mango, avocado and various citrus fruits as part of menu items.

What can you make with pineapple? “Pineapple mango chutney, pineapple shortbread, pineapple a million ways,” LaVallee said.

LaValle offers this reminder: Some 100 years ago, the county’s plentiful sun and sandy land made the area a popular place to grow pineapples.

In addition to homegrown foods, Park Avenue is hopping onto another trend: The craft cocktail craze.

For instance, The Good Dean features white tequila and watermelon juice.

LaValle also is toying with the idea of offering some bespoke items, such as a delicate pork panini with “interesting greens.”

There may even be a vegetarian item on the menu to appeal to a greater variety of diners.

As for the future, LaVallee said he’s looking for new locations. He closed an east Boca Raton location but he’s on the hunt for a location in west Boca Raton.

And he’d like to open a store in Royal Palm Beach, too, he said.

 

 

Subculture Coffee finds new home in Delray Beach

Subculture Coffee

 

Subculture Coffee Roasters soon will be serving java once again to loyal downtown Delray Beach customers.

The popular coffee shop has leased space at 20 W. Atlantic Avenue, the southwest corner of Swinton and Atlantic avenues. The location formerly was home to Nature’s Way Café.

New home of Subculture Coffee in Delray Beach

The move comes after the West Palm Beach-based coffee company closed its downtown Delray Beach space at 123 E. Atlantic Ave., following the loss of a trial for eviction in March.

Subculture’s move to the south side of Atlantic Avenue is part of a long-term deal between the coffee company and Hudson Holdings, owner of property on the south side of Atlantic Avenue along Swinton Avenue.

The coffee shop will be in a temporary funky, green building along Atlantic Avenue until Hudson Holdings wins the city’s OK to do a restoration of six historic houses on Swinton Avenue.

If all goes to plan, Subculture then will move into one of those houses and take the entire space, as Subculture co-owner Rodney Mayo now has with his iconic Dada restaurant on North Swinton Avenue.

Mayo said Hudson Holdings’ Steven Michael called Mayo and pitched him the idea when he heard Subculture needed new space.

“It’s been my dream to have a coffee shop in an old historic house. This clinched the deal,” Mayo said.

The coffee company posted news of its temporary new Delray Beach location on its Facebook page Tuesday: “Say hello to our new home at the corner of Swinton & Atlantic. Construction is underway!”

Indeed, workers on Wednesday were sanding concrete floors and quickly readying the space for Subculture, which expects to be open by the end of May.

Mayo said the new location will be more akin to the main, West Palm Beach store, at 509 Clematis St. Subculture’s new spot will serve a range of food, including breakfast and lunch until 3 p.m. There also will be a separate annex for juices.

But coffee will not be roasted at 20 W. Atlantic Ave., as it was in the old Delray spot and as it is now in West Palm Beach.

On the plus side, the new location will have substantially more seating. That’s because at 2,200 square feet, it will be three times as large.

“Everyone is ecstatic because it will have more parking and more seats,” said Mayo, who noted that some patrons found it frustrating to have to “pay $10 to park for a $5 cup of coffee.”

Mayo also plans to host events there, including poetry readings and live music.

The location is temporary because Hudson Holdings plans to tear down 20 W. Atlantic Ave. and rebuilt into a 22,000-square foot, four-story building. The building will featuring retail on the ground floor, office space on the second floor, and then residential space on the third and fourth floors.

A breezeway to an interior courtyard and walkway leading to the six restored historic homes, including Subculture’s house, is part of the design.

Mayo said the house will have five parking spots just for to-go orders, plenty of nearby parking and also, outdoor seating.

All of this hinges on Hudson Holdings’ plan to restore and reuse the historic homes, plus plans to build a new hotel and condo-hotel units across from the Sundy House on South Swinton Avenue.

For more on this story, check back with mypalmbeachpost.com.

Subculture Coffee finds new home in Delray Beach

Subculture Coffee

 

Subculture Coffee Roasters soon will be serving java once again to loyal downtown Delray Beach customers.

The popular coffee shop has leased space at 20 W. Atlantic Avenue, the southwest corner of Swinton and Atlantic avenues. The location formerly was home to Nature’s Way Café.

New home of Subculture Coffee in Delray Beach

The move comes after West Palm Beach-based coffee company closed its downtown Delray Beach space at 123 E. Atlantic Ave., after it lost an eviction lawsuit in March.

Subculture’s move to the south side of Atlantic Avenue is part of a long-term deal between the coffee company and Hudson Holdings, owner of property on the south side of Atlantic Avenue along Swinton Avenue.

The coffee shop will be in a temporary funky, green building along Atlantic Avenue until Hudson Holdings wins the city’s OK to do a restoration of six historic houses there.

If all goes to plan, Subculture then will move into one of those houses and take the entire space, as Subculture co-owner Rodney Mayo now has with his iconic Dada restaurant on North Swinton Avenue.

Mayo said Hudson Holdings’ Steven Michael called Mayo and pitched him the idea when he heard Subculture needed new space.

“It’s been my dream to have a coffee shop in an old historic house. This clinched the deal,” Mayo said.

The coffee company posted news of its temporary new Delray Beach location on its Facebook page Tuesday: “Say hello to our new home at the corner of Swinton & Atlantic. Construction is underway!”

Indeed, workers on Wednesday were sanding concrete floors and quickly readying the space for Subculture, which expects to be open by the end of May.

Mayo said the new location will be more akin to the main, West Palm Beach store, at 509 Clematis St. Subculture’s new spot will serve a range of food, including breakfast and lunch until 3 p.m. There also will be a separate annex for juices.

But coffee will not be roasted at 20 W. Atlantic Ave., as it was in the old Delray spot and as it is now in West Palm Beach.

On the plus side, the new location will have substantially more seating. That’s because at 2,200 square feet, it will be three times as large.

“Everyone is ecstatic because it will have more parking and more seats,” said Mayo, who noted that some patrons found it frustrating to have to “pay $10 to park for a $5 cup of coffee.”

Mayo also plans to host events there, including poetry readings and live music.

The location is temporary because Hudson Holdings plans to tear down 20 W. Atlantic Ave. and rebuilt into a 22,000-square foot, four-story building. The building will featuring retail on the ground floor, office space on the second floor, and then residential space on the third and fourth floors.

A breezeway to an interior courtyard and walkway leading to the six restored historic homes, including Subculture’s house, is part of the design.

Mayo said the house will have five parking spots just for to-go orders, plenty of nearby parking and also, outdoor seating.

All of this hinges on Hudson Holdings’ plan to restore and reuse the historic homes, plus plans to build a new hotel and condo-hotel units across from the Sundy House on South Swinton Avenue.

For more on this story, check back with mypalmbeachpost.com.

Farmer’s Table restaurant offering new Express food service

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Farmer’s Table, a popular Boca Raton restaurant serving fresh, seasonal food, is opening a unique take-out business it hopes could be a model for future expansion.

Farmer’s Table Express will include sandwiches, salads and snacks. It also will feature popular Farmer’s Tables dishes that are sealed at the restaurant so they can be prepared later at home.

The restaurant has dubbed Farmer’s Table Express the “slow food fast” take-away concept. It is next door to the restaurant and adjacent to the Wyndam Hotel at 1950 Glades Road.

“We wanted to create new opportunities in a different way to get healthy food into consumers’ hands” — and do it in a fast, convenient way,” said Abigail Nagorski, Farmer’s Table Express general manager.

Mitchell Robbins, the restaurant’s co-owner, said customers dining in the restaurant will be able to order Express meals from their table and have their take-out orders brought to their table before they leave.

Customers also can order online at farmerstableexpress.com or by phone and pick up their food. Hours for Farmers Table Express are 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily.

Plans are to offer the service starting in late November or early December.

The idea has been in the works since the summer, Nagorski said, and the restaurant has an executive chef dedicating to Farmer’s Table Express. New menu items have been created, including the snacks, such as almond butter oat date bites and chia pudding parfait.

Owners decided to vacuum seal certain menu items, so they will taste as fresh as if diners ate them in the restaurant. The items can be heated at home in boiling water from one to five minutes. Nagorski said sealed items can last about two weeks in the refrigerator.

If the concept works, plans are to expand Farmer’s Table Express, possibly to standalone locations. Over time, there could even be home delivery.

Nagorski believes it’s the only concept in the area to combine sealed food techniques with meals that are already fully prepared.

Farmer’s Table is known for its healthy food, which is sourced from local farms when possible. Dishes are not prepared with butter or cream, and the restaurant does not have a deep-fat fryer or microwave.

In addition, the restaurant says it does not use food that has chemicals, pesticides, hormones or antibiotics. The menu features something for everyone, including gluten-free items, vegan and vegetarian dishes, as well as meat dishes.

Farmer’s Table is owned by Robbins and chef Joey Giannuzzi.

 

Outback restaurant co-founder creates new eatery

Bolay restaurant planned for Wellington
Bolay restaurant planned for Wellington

Restaurateur Tim Gannon, co-founder of Outback restaurant  and creator of the “Bloomin’ Onion,” has a knack for knowing what people want to eat.

Now Gannon and son, Chris, are out with a new concept: Bolay, a hip, fun eatery opening in Wellington in February 2016. Bolay will open in the newly-built Buckingham Plaza at 250 S. State Road 7.

Bolay promises to be a fast-casual concept featuring bowls “packed with nutrient-rich super foods” and proteins.

Translation: Look for items such as gluten-free cilantro noodles, Peruvian quinoa and marinated kale and currant salad.

Featured vegetables include Paleo sprouts, smoky cauliflower and and maple-roasted butternut squash. Proteins will include tuna, spiced steak, lemon chicken and tofu.

The concept will allow people to walk through a line and direct a Bolay employee to include the desired food items.

The food is intended to be healthy, nutritious and loaded with energy. “We want people to feel good about what they’re about to compose and eat,” Tim Gannon said.

Bolay, in fact, is the polar-opposite of the heavy, fried meal. “We’re going to be food-coma free,” Chris Gannon quipped.

“Every molecule in the building is going to be healthy,” Tim Gannon added.

But taste is important, too. The Gannons hail from New Orleans, where flavor and spice are important. “As much as the Bloom’ Onion send you flavor-wise into a special place, we’ll do the same thing without the heavy feeling or caloric content,” Tim Gannon said.

Gannon, who now lives on Palm Beach, is a former Wellington resident and polo aficionado. He said Wellington is dedicated to being physical and healthy, making it a good fit for the first Bolay store.

But Gannon expects to expand quickly once open. He’d like to open in West Palm Beach and Palm Beach Gardens, and throughout South Florida. Franchising is an option down the road, too, he said.

For now, though, Tim Gannon said he’s happy to work with son, Chris, to get Bolay off the ground.

In addition to food, Bolay also will feature cold-pressed juices, wine and craft beer from nearby breweries, Chris Gannon said.

As much as possible, food will be locally sourced and seasonal, Chris added.

Chef Martin Oswald, former protégé of Wolfgang Puck, helped curate Bolay’s menu.  Oswald is known for cooking food based on a Nutritarian diet,  a way of eating based on food choices that maximize the micronutrients per calorie.

Tim Gannon expects the bowls to be priced from between $8 to $11 for lunch, and he said they will be large enough for people to save some to eat later for dinner, too.

Bolay will be open from 10:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. seven days a week. A grand opening date is not yet known but will be announced in the future.