Lantana airport fix difficult, PBC commissioner says

Slashing rents at the Lantana airport may not provide enough relief to overcoming the financial losses facing businesses there in the wake of President Donald Trump‘s frequent visits to the area,  Palm Beach County Commissioner Dave Kerner said this week.

Jonathan Miller (center), CEO of Stellar Aviation Group, speaks with Congresswoman Lois Frankel (left) and Palm Beach County Commissioner Dave Kerner (right) Monday, February 13, 2017 following a press briefing at Lantana Airport to discuss the impact on local aviation businesses during President Trump’s visits to Palm Beach County. Lantana Airport is listed the 10th busiest “general aviation” air facility in the nation. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)

Kerner, whose district includes the small general aviation airport, said that county-issued rent reductions for tenants at the airfield may not go far enough to keep those businesses afloat.

Flight restrictions have seriously impeded operations at the facility  on the four weekends President Trump has come to town since early February.

Business owners at the airport say they’re losing as much as a combined $15,000 a day every weekend when the president visits Mar-a-Lago.

On Monday, federal and county officials spent 1 1/2 hours meeting with U.S. Secret Service agents to discuss the financial toll the flight restrictions have had on businesses at the small airport off Lantana Road just west of Interstate 95.

“It was made very clear to us today that the Secret Service will not make any changes at this time to the flight restrictions,” U.S. Rep. Lois Frankel, D-West Palm Beach, said after Monday’s meeting. “So, unfortunately for Lantana, that means when the president is here, those aircraft will be grounded.”

To help offset the losses, Frankel said the county might have to consider rent reductions for businesses at the small general aviation airport.

The county then could try to seek reimbursement for those losses from the federal government, she said.

But Kerner said Tuesday that the rent reductions may not go far enough, adding that even with the discounts it would be difficult to keep airport tenants or attract new ones.

Kerner said it will be hard to convince businesses t0 make capital investments in their operations at the airport given the potential that flight restrictions could be imposed with very little notice.

“Who is going to want to rent there?” Kerner said.  “Who is going to be based there?…Businesses that are serious about business are going to look elsewhere. That is going to have a long-term effect on the airport for years to come.”

 

Publix hides National Enquirer covers after complaints

If you want to read The National Enquirer while you’re waiting online at Publix, you’ll have to hunt for it behind a plastic cover shielding its front page from public view.

The Regency Court at Woodfield is a Publix-anchored shopping center of 139,703 square feet. (contributed photo)
The Regency Court at Woodfield is a Publix-anchored shopping center of 139,703 square feet. (contributed photo)

After receiving continued complaints about the tabloid, Publix said it decided to add the Enquirer to the list of publications that it covers in its stores. In a statement posted on the grocer’s website, Publix officials said the decision was in response to numerous complaints not “particular cover or any political views.”

“Recently, due to continual complaints, Publix added The National Enquirer to the list of titles we permanently cover in our stores, the statement read. “Please know that this decision was based solely on a long history of customer complaints regarding offensive and objectionable material, not in response to a particular cover or any political views.”

But the move has drawn fire from some customers, who say the decision to cover the publication came after the tabloid ran a story about President-Elect Donald Trump. Some took to Twitter to sound off about the move.

 

Here is Publix’s full statement on the decision: “Recently, due to continual complaints, Publix added The National Enquirer to the list of titles we permanently cover in our stores. Please know that this decision was based solely on a long history of customer complaints regarding offensive and objectionable material, not in response to a particular cover or any political views.

Publix is a company that cares about its customers, and we work hard to create a pleasant shopping experience. It is our mission to do our very best to satisfy all Publix customers, but unfortunately in today’s complex world this is not always an easy task.

Occasionally, we receive customer concerns regarding certain materials that contain objectionable print or photographs. As a result, our stores have “blinders” which are used to conceal these types of covers. Some magazine titles have pushed the limits with pictures and occasional controversial, sexual and inflammatory words that result in significant customer concerns. When that occurs, we advise our stores to maintain a permanent cover over such publications. A blinder will continue to be placed over this magazine every week, regardless of cover content.”

Trump National resort sued over bedbug bites

A New Jersey man has filed suit against Trump National Doral Miami, a luxury resort owned by the Trump Organization, after he says he was bitten by bedbugs while staying in the property’s Jack Nicklaus villa building.

Learn the facts about bedbugs. (Fotolia)
Learn the facts about bedbugs. (Fotolia)

In a lawsuit filed this week in Miami-Dade County, Eric Linder said he suffered from multiple bedbug bites during his stay in March. The bites left welts, lumps and marks over much of his face, neck, arm and torso, the suit alleged.

In the suit, Linder alleged the building had a history of bed bug problems dating back to at least Jan. 2016, but continued to allow guest to stay in “unsuitable” rooms.

Linder, who lives in Fort Lee, New Jersey, is seeking damages of more than $15,000.